As Australia fires rage, crews airdrop vegetables to feed starving animals

In an attempt to save the billions of starving animals trapped in Australia’s bushfires, the New South Wales government reportedly dropped over 4,800 pounds of vegetables Sunday, using helicopters and airplanes to access the area.

“Operation Rock Wallaby” was commissioned to send thousands of vegetables from the sky to feed brush-tailed rock wallabies — an endangered species at risk of extinction, The Sun reported.

According to a recent estimate from the University of Sydney, over 1 billion animals already may have died as officials warned that Australia’s wildfire season — which generally would last through March — was nowhere near its end.

A wallaby eating a carrot after NSW's National Parks and Wildlife Service staff air-dropped them in bushfire-stricken areas around Wollemi and Yengo National Parks, New South Wales, Australia.

A wallaby eating a carrot after NSW’s National Parks and Wildlife Service staff air-dropped them in bushfire-stricken areas around Wollemi and Yengo National Parks, New South Wales, Australia. (NSW DPIE Environment, Energy and Science/Handout via REUTERS)

AUSTRALIA’S FIRES HAVE KILLED OR IMPERILED 1 BILLION ANIMALS, EXPERT WARNS

On Sunday, helicopters loaded with boxes of sweet potatoes and carrots flew over bushland and canyons.

NSW's National Parks and Wildlife Service staff flying with carrots and sweet potatoes before air-dropping them for animals in bushfire-stricken areas around Wollemi National Park.

NSW’s National Parks and Wildlife Service staff flying with carrots and sweet potatoes before air-dropping them for animals in bushfire-stricken areas around Wollemi National Park. (NSW DPIE Environment, Energy and Science/Handout via REUTERS)

ANNA KOOIMAN SAYS AUSTRALIA WILDFIRES ‘HEARTBREAKING SITUATION’ AS WILDLIFE PERISH IN BLAZE

The fires, which have ravaged Australia for months, have spread quickly and overwhelmed efforts to contain them. Two massive bushfires in southeastern Australia recently merged into one gigantic megafire measuring nearly 1.5 million acres, NPR reported. In total, over 130 bushfires have claimed the lives of 26 people and destroyed at least 3,000 homes, according to published reports.

NSW's National Parks and Wildlife Service staff dropping the vegetables from a helicopter.

NSW’s National Parks and Wildlife Service staff dropping the vegetables from a helicopter. (NSW DPIE Environment, Energy and Science/Handout via REUTERS)

Efforts to save endangered wildlife have been underway across the country.

IRWIN FAMILY TREATING HUNDREDS OF ANIMALS AMID AUSTRALIA WILDFIRES

On Kangaroo Island, a refuge for some of the country’s most endangered creatures off the coast of South Australia state, teams had arrived to help euthanize livestock and wild animals injured in the fires.

The wife and son of the late Australian zookeeper and popular television personality Steve Irwin — also known as “The Crocodile Hunter” — told Fox News last week that they have initiated their own efforts to save endangered wildlife.

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“We are taking what we can, we are doing emergency fundraising and building more facilities right now,” the owner of the Australia Zoo, Terri Irwin, said on “Fox & Friends.” “We’re at capacity right now for koalas, we’re over capacity for fruit bats and we are seeing a number of other animals.”

Fox News’ Christopher Carbone contributed to this report.

Yael Halon is a reporter for Fox News.

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